School Shooting 1840


John A.G. Davis

Davis’s gravestone at the University of Virginia Cemetery in Charlottesville, Virginia.

In the early 19th century, rioting was a common practice in the United States among students who either didn’t like the food, the rules or the punishments meted out to them. William and Mary students rioted in 1802 after professors punished two fellow classmates for dueling. Bad food—old fish and overripe cabbage—ignited Harvard’s Rotten Cabbage Rebellion in 1807. That same year, Princeton students rioted after three classmates were suspended.

The University of Virginia endured at least six riots in its earliest days. During one riot, a professor was murdered—one of the worst crimes committed at the University in its long history.

It happened this way: One of the new traditions at UVA was the celebration of the 1836 military company riot, which the students had interpreted as a victory over professorial authority. Every November the students fired their pistols, set off firecrackers, lit fires and in general spent the night caterwauling.

But on this autumn night in 1840, the disturbance was too much for John A.G. Davis, the school’s law professor since 1830. He stepped out, as he no doubt had many times in the past, to put a halt to the hullabaloo, caused predominantly by two masked students parading around the Lawn firing blank cartridges.

Around 9:00 p.m., he saw one of the masked students hiding behind one of the pillars. Davis jumped for him and reached to unmask the student. The student fled, but turned after a few steps, pointed his pistol, and, without uttering a word, fired at Davis’ gut. The bullet pierced Davis’ abdomen, and he fell to the ground with a groan.

Students soon flocked to the pavilion as word spread that a professor had been shot. Several picked up Davis’ limp, bleeding body and brought the wounded man inside. On November 14, a Saturday, he succumbed to his wounds at sundown.

respected and well liked by the students, Davis attempted to stop the two students who were causing the disturbance and was shot by one. The killer, although masked, was identified as Joseph Green Semmes.

Students, chastened by the turn of events, joined in the search for Semmes and located him hiding in the forest. Semmes was imprisoned in the county jail for several months while several trial dates were postponed; then, in July 1841, released on $25,000 bond, by reason of deteriorating health. However, he failed to appear for trial in October 1841, and eventually committed suicide, years later.

Young Semmes, who some years since shot Professor Davis at the Virginia University, brought his life to an end by his own hand, the morning of the 9th instant [9 July 1847], at the house of his brother in Washington, Georgia. He shot himself with a pistol, the ball entering the left eye and penetrating the brain and lingered in a state of total insensibility from about 7 o’clock, A. M., when his family was called to his room by the report of a pistol, until half past 1. P. M. of the same day.

— Edgefield Advertiser (SC), 11 August 1847

And so began the search for the student who murdered the professor. This time, the students joined in the hunt for one of their own. Where previous acts of violence had always ended with students closing ranks, this time—for the first time—they sided with University authorities and recognized that there were limits to their insubordinate behavior. They held a meeting the following morning to express their “indignation and abhorrence.”

Young Semmes, who some years since shot Professor Davis at the Virginia University, brought his life to an end by his own hand, the morning of the 9th instant [9 July 1847], at the house of his brother in Washington, Georgia. He shot himself with a pistol, the ball entering the left eye and penetrating the brain and lingered in a state of total insensibility from about 7 o’clock, A. M., when his family was called to his room by the report of a pistol, until half past 1. P. M. of the same day.

— Edgefield Advertiser (SC), 11 August 1847

Expecting a violent confrontation, two students found Semmes hiding in a pine grove and turned him over to the authorities. He offered no resistance. Semmes’ family would later post bail, which he quickly jumped. Soon afterward, he committed suicide.

The murder would meld with a confluence of events—a rise in religious fervor and a growing temperance movement—to tame student behavior. The change was abetted by the birth of the Honor System, which led students—with Davis’ murder still in mind—to decide that reporting misbehavior would be honorable. That change in behavior, coupled with smarter leadership, saved UVA.

Henri Becquerel

Radioactive Radiation and it’s Mysterying Affects lecture Nobel Prize paper by Henri Becquerel free PDF Download. Must read.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UPPs8vfhpgR_6g4vyJ8lPwv3iEkuC61_/view?usp=drivesdk

(/ˌbɛkəˈrɛl/;[2] French: [ɑ̃ʁi bɛkʁɛl]; 15 December 1852 – 25 August 1908) was a French physicist, Nobel laureate, and the first person to discover evidence of radioactivity. For work in this field he, along with Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie,[3] received the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics. The SI unit for radioactivity, the becquerel (Bq), is named after him.

Experiments

Describing them to the French Academy of Sciences on 27 February 1896, he said:

One wraps a Lumière photographic plate with a bromide emulsion in two sheets of very thick black paper, such that the plate does not become clouded upon being exposed to the sun for a day. One places on the sheet of paper, on the outside, a slab of the phosphorescent substance, and one exposes the whole to the sun for several hours. When one then develops the photographic plate, one recognizes that the silhouette of the phosphorescent substance appears in black on the negative. If one places between the phosphorescent substance and the paper a piece of money or a metal screen pierced with a cut-out design, one sees the image of these objects appear on the negative … One must conclude from these experiments that the phosphorescent substance in question emits rays which pass through the opaque paper and reduce silver salts.[16][17]

Late career

Later in his life in 1900, Becquerel measured the properties of Beta Particles, and he realized that they had the same measurements as high speed electrons leaving the nucleus.[5][7] In 1901 Becquerel made the discovery that radioactivity could be used for medicine. Henri made this discovery when he left a piece of radium in his vest pocket and noticed that he had been burnt by it. This discovery led to the development of radiotherapy which is now used to treat cancer.[5] Becquerel did not survive much longer after his discovery of radioactivity and died on 25 August 1908, at the age of 55, in Le Croisic, France.[8] His death was caused by unknown causes, but was reported that “he had developed serious burns on his skin, likely from the handling of radioactive materials.”[20]

Frederick Soddy Englishradiochemist Offering a perspective on economics rooted in physics 

Frederick Soddy

Courtney of Wikipedia 2019

[16] Soddy named this concept isotope meaning ‘same place’. The word ‘isotope’ was initially suggested to him by Margaret Todd. Later, J. J. Thomson showed that non-radioactive elements can also have multiple isotopes.

FRS[2] (2 September 1877 – 22 September 1956) was an Englishradiochemist who explained, with Ernest Rutherford, that radioactivity is due to the transmutation of elements, now known to involve nuclear reactions. He also proved the existence of isotopes of certain radioactive elements.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]Frederick Soddy FRS[2] (2 September 1877 – 22 September 1956) was an Englishradiochemist who explained, with Ernest Rutherford, that radioactivity is due to the transmutation of elements, now known to involve nuclear reactions. He also proved the existence of isotopes of certain radioactive elements.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

John Marshall History of George Washington

History of President Washington written back in 18th-century. Eye poping learning experience. Today does America have what it takes to win wars battles or just cut and run. Start to fight and get tired or if it gets to expensive we bail, or we just talk, talk, talk, sanctions over sanctions but really do nothing. Have our Warships and bombers fly around and buzz our foes and do little else. Abandoned our allies in their worst hour and do nothing but send in inspection people and observers as people die. Where our enemies tell us what to do and give money to our leaders charities and some how that’s not a crime. While millions of people wait there secret sudden swift demise.

You’ll love this book it pulls no punches of what has to be done and what’s allowed the gloves are off death awaits. Read and share. Thanks Mark A. Felkins

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Here is your link pdf book file free to read not for resale but share with the world. Wipe away ignorance one person at a time.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xgxMntGuxLhg8id0kqqUS9Q8y_YuE9aN/view?usp=drivesdk

Alien Structures On The Moon!

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What is this? Ancient Steal beams now carbon sticking out of the ground? This is in the moon! Amazing! This structure could be billions of years old.

You can see here the buried steal beams continues underground for awhile. Pictures Courtesy of Google Moon and NASA. Let me know what you think below? Share.

Alien Structures On The Moon!

I found what appears to be Alien Structures in the Moon! Check back for more Structures on the Moon! This one has a round pipe coming out the roof top! Could the this be an Alien home? What do you think?

This picture can play tricks on your mind. Sometimes this picture will look like a crater with a hole in the ground! Other times like a hill with a pipe coming out of the top!

Depending on how your eye catches the photo. Strange. Here is a large pic of the area.



Look below and see the plant root! You can see the root off the ground because it casts a shadow on the ground below! So at one time plants did grow on the Moon.

And these plants are all over the place. Photos Courtesy of Google Moon and NASA.

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