John Locke

I doubt this information is taught in schools anymore. Or even have this book in the School, Public Library’s, Universities. By reading this you’ll have more knowledge about how our Founding Father Wanted Our United States of America Government to be.


Below are free books PDFs of his work. Download and enlighten yourselves. This helped shaped the United States of America Constitution. And our Founding Fathers. Share with family and friends.


His arguments concerning liberty and the social contract later influenced the written works of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and other Founding Fathers of the United States. In fact, one passage from the Second Treatise is reproduced verbatim in the Declaration of Independence,


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Federalist Papers

James Madison, Hamilton’s major collaborator, later President of the United States.

Alexander Hamilton, author of the majority of The Federalist Papers.

John Jay, author of five of The Federalist Papers, later became the first Chief Justice of the United States.

Here is the Federalist Papers a must read in understanding the Constitution of the United States of America. Books one and two. Free.

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Courtesy of Wikipedia 2018

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym “Publius” to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. The first 77 of these essays were published serially in the Independent Journal, the New York Packet, and The Daily Advertiser between October 1787 and April 1788.[1] A two-volume compilation of these 77 essays and eight others was published as The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution, as Agreed upon by the Federal Convention, September 17, 1787 by publishing firm J. & A. McLean in March and May 1788.[2][3] The collection was commonly known as The Federalist until the name The Federalist Papers emerged in the 20th century.

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